Asian and Global Resource Center

By Jacklyn Nowotnik


Photos and story by Jacklyn Nowotnik

Photos and story by Jacklyn Nowotnik

Students involved in the Asian & Global Resource Center at Northeastern Illinois University promoted Asian culture by doing henna hand art to willing students.
Henna ink comes from the powdered leaves of the henna plant, which can be found in parts of Africa and southern Asia.  It is commercially cultivated to be used as a fabric and hair dye, and also for body art. The use of henna as a hair dye goes as far back as ancient Egypt. Mummies were found with henna hair dye in their hair. Archeologists speculate that henna acts as a natural preservative on mummies. Henna is also used as a leather dye and preservation, and has anti-fungal properties.
Henna is used as a body decoration for special events such as births and weddings in many regions of the world, including the Middle East, North Africa, and Asia. The style and motif of the henna hand art depends on the regional preferences, and can include geometric designs, organic or natural shapes, and complex patterns of dots.
Look for more events from the Asian & Global Resource Center in the Student Union coming soon!