The Independent

Woman’s Work?

November 14, 2012


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By Matthew Greenberg – Sports Editor Photos by Mathew Greenberg Photo by Mathew Greenberg Woman’s Work?is the newest gallery presented by artists Anni Holm, Mark Newport and Lindsay Obermeyer. The gallery is on display from Nov. 5-30 in the Fine Arts building. The exhibition theme is taken from a series by Obermeyer and features “forms of artmaking by women, such as knitting, crocheting, embroidery, etc.” The distinctly unique nature of the gallery is showcased by walls displaying yarn-work with fantastically complimentary color schemes, a portrayal of the Chicago skyline, and a television showing a character knitting in a rocking chair. The artists’ statement explains, “Endeavors such as these not only have had to overcome the stigma of ‘craft’ but also their association with the feminine due to their ties to the home and to the family. Yet while our customary idea of family has changed and ‘sewing arts’ have overcome their non-high art classification, there remains something inherently familial, homey often, about these particular art forms.” Linsday Obermeyer will speak about the exhibition on Thursday Nov. 29 at 3 p.m., and will also be hosting workshops Thursday Nov. 8th and 13th at 3 p.m. Sign up for these workshops in FA 105B. The closing reception will be on Friday November 30th from 6-9 p.m....

Obama Defeats Mitt Romney, Earns Second Term

November 14, 2012


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By Patrick McIntyre – Staff Writer President Obama has defeated Republican challenger Mitt Romney in a landslide victory, making a clean sweep of almost all swing states, including Ohio, Wisconsin and Florida.  Running on the slow but consistent recovery of the nation’s crippled economy, Obama will enter his second term. Demographics played a pivotal role in Obama’s reelection, crippling the GOP’s election bid.  Earning just 39% of white voters, he carried 93% of black voters, 71% of Latinos, 73% of Asians, and 60% of the youth vote (18-29). The most immediate issue now facing Obama is the looming “fiscal cliff” rapidly approaching Jan. 1, whereby numerous tax increases and spending cuts will be implemented unless Congress is able to come to an agreement over these economic issues.  Passed by Congress in 2011, in an effort to force compromise on pressing economic issues, the budget package cuts Obama’s payroll tax cut, withdraws unemployment benefits, rolls back defense and “discretionary” spending—varying from education to homeland security.  Experts anticipate great risk of a repeated recession unless efforts are made to prevent the drastic cuts. The debt and poor economy were unavoidably the key issues for both candidates to face this election cycle.  Contrary to Obama’s claims during his 2008 presidential bid, when he promised to cut the deficit in half, we are now in a fourth year under Obama in a trillion-dollar plus deficit. Often tagged as unclear with economic plans, Obama’s policies will hopefully continue to invest in a strong and robust middle class, a clear strategy in his first term.  Investments in education, for example, will rarely foster a speedy recovery to a poor economy.  They will, however, result in long term middle-class stability because of a well-trained workforce.  His attempts to disassemble the Bush-era No Child Left Behind law, the four-year, $10,000 college tax credit for college students, and increases to the Pell Grants and other financial aid have been wildly popular.  The crushing debt of college student loans is the fast growing debt source in the nation, and without the aid and assistance Obama has implemented in his first term, many would have to rescind on their dreams and reconsider higher education as a viable option. The crucial point to remember is that Obama’s campaign promises and decidedly vague ideas are nearly a photocopy from four years ago.  Therein lies the interpretation: whether we are on track to a resilient recovery and if we are implementing strategies to avoid future, possibly more detrimental fiscal perils. So what can we expect?  A stable tax rate for people making under $200,000 has been a continued promise, and one Obama kept in his first term, but there is that lingering “fiscal cliff.”  The tax increases, he claims, will be directed to people in the upper bracket, but details still remain fuzzy as to the precise numbers and brackets being discussed.  Obama plans to utilize these “new” tax increases on the rich, plus other, unspecified spending cuts to tackle the massive accumulating debt. Obama is holding strong to plans of ending the war in Afghanistan in 2014.  On many foreign policy issues, Obama, along with Romney, seemed to join forces and largely agreed on crucial issues, forcing a lack of choice for voters.  Amy Goodman, from the online news show Democracy Now!, claimed a variety of issues weren’t even mentioned, equating the debates and election as an abandonment of choice for voters.  “Several key international issues were not addressed at all,” Goodman said, “including climate change, the economic crisis in Europe, and the U.S-backed drug war in Latin America.”  The avoidance of these issues denotes support for the status quo by Obama. After one term, a question still looms that also dominated during the debates: “Are the American people better off than four years ago?” The U.S. currently has a robust stock market and housing prices have increased for the past five straight months.  Americans are currently in their 44th month of job increases. Because of this, the unemployment rate is hovering around the area it was at when Obama first entered office, when jobs would continue to hemorrhage for some time.  While Romney claimed during the election that this was insufficient and his policies would foster a quicker recovery, he could not gain enough support to win the race. Obama now has another four years to capitalize on the progress he has already made....

Oakton Woods

November 14, 2012


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By Dayani Pieri – Staff Writer             Beautiful Oakton woods surrounds the Des Plaines campus of Oakton Community College (Oakton). Oakton got its name from the majestic native oaks that dressed the forest and gave its inhabitants shade and sustenance. By the 1800’s, non-native species that were imported into this nation by European settlers had thrived and begun to encroach on the native trees’ environment. Today, one of the Midwest’s noxious weeds is the European buckthorn or Rhamnus cathartica. This is a woody shrub which was used mostly as an ornamental or for hedging; to keep wild animals out of the property. Its advantage is its berries that attract the birds who in turn carry the seeds and spread them. Originally classified as a shrub, buckthorn, today, has grown to become as tall as a small tree and has invaded many Midwestern forests including Oakton Woods. This invasive species coupled with several others have taken over Illinois forests and floodplains, and continue to defeat native species in their struggle for survival. If not for the efforts of the Oakton forest manager Ken Schaefer, and the dedicated students and faculty of its Ecology Club, Illinois residents would cease to enjoy the native oaks of Oakton Woods. The Annual Fall Workday marks Oakton’s efforts to restore these woodlands to its original state and to protect our native oaks. This year’s Fall Workday was conducted on Nov. 3. It began with breakfast and registration at 8:30 a.m. An introduction, safety instructions, and demonstrations on how to use loppers and hand saws were given by Ken Schaefer, assisted by Jacob Schmidt of Oakton. After wearing safety goggles and work gloves, the students got to work cutting down a large number of European buckthorn, a couple of European mulberry trees, and thinning sugar maples. Students and faculty joined forces to clear the forest of invaders. Helpers worked in groups to saw, cut, haul and burn. Groups of students were placed around the fires to control them. In about four hours, the whole area had been cleared of invasive species. Then began the prescribed burn process to clear ground cover, destroy invasive seeds and limit grow-back options in the area. The prescribed fire practitioners in their fireproof uniforms with their crew of students began the controlled burn process. Before long, the whole forest floor was ablaze, creating an imposing spectacle, according to students watching. Schmidt, the President of Oakton’s Ecology Club, explained that the opening up of the woods and the conducting of a prescribed burn “increases biodiversity.” The cutting down of the invasive species and thinning of the sugar maples also makes way for the native oaks to survive. The day following the prescribed burn, Schmidt wrote that he revisited the area and that he could already see the difference and “It looked amazing!” According to Schmidt, 70 people volunteered to make the restoration effort a success. Students and faculty from Oakton, Northeastern (NEIU), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Illinois Institute of Technology volunteered on this day. NEIU was represented by members of Tri Beta Biological Honor Society (Tri Beta) and the Green Cycle Group (GCG). GCG is an NEIU club that has become very active this semester. Its members have been actively participating in several community events including the Fall Workday. It eagerly looks forward to the upcoming Energy Sustainability Effort event that will be held on Nov. 29. Sana Sultana is the President of Tri Beta’s NEIU chapter. Sultana has recently taken over the leadership of Tri Beta and has done a marvelous job of resurrecting it from its dormancy. She has initiated and participated in many activities with the group. Fall Workday was one of those events where she was a very active participant. She has not been to a restoration prior to this day. “I went today, and man it was awesome,” wrote Sultana, “I am looking forward to going again.”...

NEIU Gets Heads Up

November 14, 2012


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By Emily Haddad – Editor-in-Chief Greg Adler – Staff Writer         Students may have noticed the sudden eruption of white Buddha heads in several places around the Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU) campus and around Albany Park at the start of the Fall 2012 semester. These resin and fiberglass heads are part of a citywide art therapy project named Ten Thousand Ripples (TTR). Described as “a collaborative public art, civic engagement and peace project,” TTR seeks to use the unusual placement of the heads to supplant an image of peace in a total of 10 Chicago neighborhoods by 2013. The project’s goals are to encourage community unity, artistic responses unique to each area and open a safe space for dialogue about increasing peace in the surrounding neighborhood. Mark McKernin, Chairman of the NEIU Art Department, acted as one of the community leaders for the Albany Park area, specifically guiding NEIU’s participation in TTR. “The statues are intended to use art as a catalyst to start a dialogue about peace and non-violence in solving conflict. Given our proximity to Albany Park, our diverse community and the internal conflicts we’ve seen over the last few years, the placement of the heads on campus seemed appropriate,” said McKernin. Mary Porterfield, NEIU Adjunct Art instructor described the heads as very calming. “When I see the statues, I get a sense of peace radiating off of them.” NEIU student response has varied. Some described the statues as surprising and eye-catching while others wondered where around Chicago they would next appear. NEIU freshman Adriana Espinoza found the statues a pleasant addition to the campus grounds. “They’re different, they remind me of cupcakes,” Espinoza said. None of the students questioned appeared to know about the Ten Thousand Ripples project specifically, and many wished there were informational plaques accompanying the heads. The Buddha heads were designed to appear as if just emerging from the ground. Designed by artist and nonviolent activist Indira Johnson, the heads symbolize the emergence of self-awareness and spiritual growth a person experiences through their lives. Johnson’s inspiration was the emphatic public response to her emerging Buddha sculptures at the Art Center of Highland Park in 2008, and the Chicago Cultural Center in 2009. “People said that they felt a sense of calm and peacefulness and this became the genesis for the Ten Thousand Ripples Project,” said Johnson in her artist statement. They grace both high traffic locations and more secluded neighborhood locations selected by civic leaders of each community to promote reflection and peace. Currently there are a total of 25 heads placed in Roger’s Park, South Chicago, Pilsen, Uptown and NEIU’s own Albany Park. NEIU has one peeking over the green between Bernard Brommel Hall and Ronald Williams Library, and a second head situated facing the Student Union in the raised garden area beside the B-building. Across from the Kimball Brown Line train station, two heads watch the pedestrians and heavy traffic at Kimball Ave and Lawrence Ave. North Park Theological Seminary campus has a Buddha across from Ohlson Hall along Foster Ave. Beside the National Shrine of St. Jude and the Pilgrim Baptist Church of South Chicago on East 91st Street, one Buddha keeps each church company. There will be a total of 100 fiberglass and resin Buddha sculptures placed around Chicago by the culmination in spring of 2013. TTR was designed by Johnson in conjunction with the education-based arts non-profit Changing Worlds. Changing Worlds was founded at Hibbard Elementary School in Albany Park with the mission to “foster inclusive communities through oral history, writing and art programs that improve student learning, affirm identity and enhance cross-cultural understanding.” TTR strives to bring neighborhoods together and enact “sustainable change” by erecting a symbol of peace as public art that localizes and initiates artistic and community response. “TTR is rooted in the beliefs that art is for the people, that community art should contribute to daily life, and that creating safe forums for residents to talk creates a habit of dialogue and a foundation for trust and mutual understanding,” according to TTR’s website. With the current murder rate at 442 so far for 2012, a number that eclipses the total 2012 U.S. casualties in Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan (285), a little trust and mutual understanding may be just what Chicago needs....

NCAA Football 2K13

November 14, 2012


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By Ari Guttman – Staff Writer NCAA Football 2K13has its ups and downs for this year’s sports fans. The game theme is “The Road    to Heisman” but it doesn’t make the cut compared to last year. The game gives out legacy stories. The Dynasty is the same as last year, but it’s different...

Mark of the ninja-just barely misses the mark

November 14, 2012


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By Greg Adler - Staff Writer Rating - 41/2 stars With the price of games constantly on the rise and more often than not requiring more downloadable content (DLC), to get any amount of real entertainment value, players are turning to their XBOX360’s and PS3’s. The only downside is that the chance of finding a game worthwhile is few and far between. Search no further. Klei Entertainment’s Mark of the Ninja moves silently onto the hard drive and swiftly into the most memorable games of 2012. This 2D, yes 2D, side-scroller makes the player happy that games have roots the like of Super Mario Bros. Klei Entertainment understands that a game, much like a good read can be told from left to right and doesn’t need to be all over the place. This is evident in two of their older titles (Shank and Shank 2). Players take the role of a ninja trying to avenge the death of fallen clan members and with the game’s controls being simple and highly responsive; it is easy to do so. The ninja bears the mark spoken of in the title, which entitles him to some advanced ninjitsu skills, such as focusing time and moving in a teleport-like manner. The obvious arsenal is accessible to your character, including: darts, a kitana, noise makers and of course a powerful grappling hook. Oddly enough, a shuriken is not among the ninjas weapon arsenal. Intense cut scenes provide a mountain of story to scale and when paired with some slippery slopes that twist and turn the overall narrative, the player will be pleasantly surprised. Mark of the Ninjaprovides some villains just as devious as the ninja; however, the gameplay provides plenty of silent and deadly ways to dispatch them. These attacks (some that must be unlocked as you play) are cleverly named for the vicious animals they mimic; the prowling spider and the flying bat are among a few.Klei ,whether they intended to or not, gave a playful nod to Hideo Kojima and his Metal Gear series by providing a cardboard box that the ninja can use at his convenience. Most games and their developers take the money and run. However, Klei decided to do something completely different and add some elasticity to the gamers’ dollar. For $15, the game packs an enormous value. Once completing the game, the menu invites the player to a “new challenge plus” mode which puts the player back into the game with tougher enemies that have a much higher alertness. They also provide a collection of differently outfitted ninjas bearing a variety of marks providing them some powerful talents. These talents give the player an edge to whatever play style they choose whether stealth or otherwise. Don’t worry, the small studio isn’t finished landing big punches (or kicks). Once the game has been completed they provide the winning player an avatar t-shirt for each mode completed. Mark of the Ninja has an outstanding replay factor that will keep players everywhere wanting to bear the mark…of the Ninja......

How Consumerism Beat Genius

November 14, 2012


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By Hiram Crespo – Staff Writer   Candles are magical, but light bulbs have a magic that candles don’t have. One never sees a cartoon with a candle symbolizing a person having a brilliant idea. Light bulbs represent human genius. While watching the documentaryPlanned Obsolescence, aka The Light Bulb Conspiracy, individuals can learn abouta light bulb that has been emitting light for over a century in California, and how it was designed by Adolphe Chailet. Prior to the year in the early 20th Century when the light bulb cartel gathered to decide that from then on, light bulbs would have a short life of several years and that people would be forced to buy light bulbs again in spite of the fact that the technology existed to create light bulbs that would function for a century. There are no added benefits to new time-bomb light bulbs. No innovation, no new technology that individuals should be grateful for. The only reason for this shift was profit. The technology to build the light bulb that has been lit in a Livermore, California, fire station for over a century –whose 100th birthday was celebrated as an act of generating awareness, and more recently the 110th birthday– was either destroyed or has been kept secret all this time. Those who stand to profit from sales of light bulbs make sure that no one is allowed to build light bulbs of their original quality anymore. As one may understand it, General Motors headed this brilliant initiative to ban the better quality of the original. The computer industry also plans and builds-in the obsolescence of its gadgets. Oftentimes, the next great thing has already been planned years in advance, so that by the time we install Gadget 3.0, they already know what Gadget 5.0 will look like. But there are fortunes to be made with each upgrade. Obsolescence is not only functional, it can also be systemic. A light bulb may explode like a time bomb or a computer may simply no longer be compatible with many of the other gadgets that we use. In all cases, the makers of these goods benefit handsomely from obsolescence. This is not entirely bad, as competition is better than monopoly. But the consumer who wishes to take advantage of a vast array of computer apps will probably have to own both Mac and PC. We’ve all seen the Mac vs. PC commercials: here are two artificial brains that don’t like to talk to each other much. Oftentimes competition takes precedence over pragmatic considerations. Some consumers (particularly in developed countries) are so docile and so easy to manipulate that when lured by the commercials, they will happily buy two, three computers, just to have the latest updates whereas computer users in India and many of the poorer countries only buy a new computer as a last resource Planned obsolescence has a huge environmental effect, adding millions of tons of trash in the developed world while in the third world people often would never think of throwing away an outdated computer. Parts are recycled, and they’re very much in demand. There needs to be a balance between competition and profit on the one hand, and pragmatism and inventiveness on the other. Just as the U.S. has geek squads in every city who can fix almost any computer problem, somewhere, somebody knows how to make Chailet’s light bulb. One can wonder what would happen if he or she were to put it in the market....

Get Out the Way

November 14, 2012


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By Joseph Daddario – Staff Writer               “Get out the way!” “Get off the sidewalk!” “Damn hippy!” are a few of the common things a biker hears while trying to maneuver around the obstacle course of Chicago streets. Drivers open doors and change lanes without looking for bikers - endangering the biker and other drivers! Not only do drivers hog the road but they are also overly aggressive and are territorial of the road. Drivers feel that because they are in a giant gas-guzzling car that they own the roads but that should never be the case. Just because a car is bigger than a bike doesn’t mean that the driver can throw common courtesy out of the window. Drivers need to learn how to share the road, like Barney said, “Sharing is caring.” Many bikers have been seriously injured or killed from a rogue door and a negligent driver. Bikers in Chicago also frequently witness aggressive and intentionally dangerous behavior against other bikers. I have personally witnessed many cycling incidents, including a woman who used her car to ram the back tire of a biker who, after signaling properly, had changed to her lane to make a turn. I myself was doored while biking. Being doored is when a driver opens their car door without looking to see if a biker, or another car in some instances, is present. Hundreds of bikers are injured in this way every year in Chicago, according to the Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT). This collision type is completely preventable by car drivers by taking an extra second to look out the rear windshield or checking the driver’s side mirror to see if the bike lane you are opening your door into is currently occupied by biker. There is relatively little a biker can do to avoid a suddenly opening door beside try to swerve out of the way, usually into equally dangerous traffic. When I was doored, I had taken all the safety precautions I was supposed to. I was wearing a helmet, had lights on the front AND back of my bike. I still was thrown into on-coming traffic. Instead of apologizing for not looking when opening his door the driver yelled at me and said “pay attention, a--hole.” He didn’t offer any insurance information and didn’t even ask if I was okay. He just walked away. Other incidents include bikers being cut off by cars changing lanes, being run off the road or even in rare instances being thrown through the car door window sustaining serious injuries. Luckily I was relatively unscathed but my bike was not, the tire was bent from being run over by another car and the handlebars were crooked. But drivers aren’t solely at fault. Chicago is seriously lacking in safe bike lanes. The roads themselves are horrendous as well. Huge potholes and absent-minded drivers hitting bikers with their doors are major problems. If drivers can admit that they aren’t the only vehicle on the road and actually look when changing lanes or opening doors, the roads would be safe for bikers and drivers alike. Drivers won’t have to worry about dents in their cars or injuring bikers, and bikers could feel safe riding on the roads. While Chicago is considered one of the top cities for bicycling by multiple bicycling alliances, with more than 170 miles of designated bike lanes, actual conditions could be better. Rahm Emmanuel proposed Bike 2015 Plan, which has eight chapters. Each chapter has specific goals likeestablishing a bikeway network that serves all neighborhoods, bicycle-friendly streets, educating bicyclists and motorists on how to deal with one another, and educating the general public about safe bicycling and promoting the health benefits of biking. These proposals, more so the educating drivers side, can make Chicago’s streets safer for bikers and drivers alike, offers opportunities to live a healthier lifestyle, decrease carbon emissions and save money!...

Dimo’s , a Pizza Experience

November 14, 2012


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By Jon-Paul Kreatsoulas—Staff Writer After a rough week of school and work-related projects piling up, all students want to do is make it to the weekend and blow off some steam with pals.  One might decide to go bar hopping to the same places they’ve been a dozen times before, but  not everyone is bold  enough to admit the desire for a change of scenery without giving up the idea of alcohol consumption. Readers are probably getting hungry at this point too, and McDonald's dollar menu doesn't offer favorite beers, let alone any beer at all. If one happens to be stumbling through the heart of Wrigleyville, they should keep their eyes open for Dimo's. Formerly known as Ian's until recently, Dimo's (3463 N. Clark) specializes in the art of constructing bizarre pizza creations, either by the slice or by the pie.  An added bonus to Dimo’s that may suit some (if not all), is the accommodation of a BYOB setting. The pizza creators at Dimo's are not shy when it comes to versatility on their work table. After one enters and stands behind the glass in amazement, their eyes feast upon the feast at hand and they’ll have difficulty choosing between a slice of macaroni and cheese pizza or a s'mores slice, covered in melted marshmallows and lightly drizzled with chocolate syrup. If they don't have much of a sweet tooth and can do without noodles on their pizza crust, there is the Philly cheese steak slice, the B.B.Q. chicken, various vegetable arrangements and Dimo's even offers vegan friendly slices. Though these are only a few of the specialty slices offered in addition to the traditional plain cheese, pepperoni and sausage toppings, Dimo's is famous for their weekly extra-specialty themed slices. Just recently, their arsenal of edibles has consisted of an Oktoberfest themed slice, a Derrick Roast Beef slice and a Smashing Pumpkin Pie slice. The staff at Dimo's is fun and welcoming, and guessing by the choice of music coming out of their sound system, mix CD's and playlists are an important element to the atmosphere. Though tiny, Dimo's offers group seating to accommodate hoards of (casual) drunkards to sit and enjoy their steaming slices, but the possibility of waiting in line, outside of the restaurant even, is quite fathomable. Any slice of Dimo's pizza will cost you about $3.75, but be sure to snag a punch card that entitles customers to a free slice once they've purchased ten of them. Dimo's is a great place to hibernate for an hour or so once coming out of a buzzed state of mind, or just an awesome pick on any night of the week. It's the kind of place that houses the romantic pizza eaters who enjoy the company of a bottle of wine, the loud pack that huddles over a 24 pack, or the most dedicated elite of pizza aficionados....

Cyclist Menace Growing, Nationally Recognized

November 14, 2012


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By Emily Haddad – Editor-in-Chief Illinois saw 3,107 cyclist collisions in 2011, with 1,757 in Chicago alone, according to the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT). The news regularly reports on cyclists being hit and killed by distracted drivers or wiping out and sustaining serious injuries...

Chicago Public Schools: A Self-Destructive System

November 14, 2012


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By Karina Rivera – Staff Writer Bold words from Jean-Claude Brizard show little mercy to the current Chicago Public Schools (CPS) system. Misplaced power, according to this resigned CEO of CPS, is the key error of CPS. Power currently reigns in the realm of bureaucracy and administrators, rather...

Champs for Charity

November 14, 2012


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By Katie Kelly – Staff Writer The score was tied at 15-15 at the end of regulation and all that was left was a shoot out. This is one of the most exciting ending situations in hockey. That was the situation as the Blackhawks current and former players, the Chicago Stars as they were called, played in the Champs for Charity game on Friday October 25 for Ronald McDonald House in Chicago. With no advertisements made for this game, and only two weeks of word of mouth publicity, they were able to raise over $323,500. From the very beginning the game felt different than any other hockey game. The charity game had brought an atmosphere of hope, strength and courage to the players and fans. A record attendance of 11,649 fans packed into the Allstate Arena. A 12-year-old girl from the Ronald McDonald House in Chicago belted out the national anthem that brought fans to their feet. Her amazing vocals set the tone for the rest of the night. Three young boys, all of whom suffer from various illnesses and also spend time at the Ronald McDonald House in Chicago, did the ceremonial puck drop. The players were on their feet cheering and clapping for the young boys who overcame their illnesses to attend the game. The game began with three goals scored by the opposing World Team, which consisted of hockey players from other NHL teams who volunteered their time. Craig Anderson, goalie for the Chicago Stars, was off to a bad start letting the three shots get past him. Anderson used to play for the Chicago Blackhawks, but is now the goalie for the Ottawa Senators. It was obvious the Stars needed to step up their game. Patrick Kane, Jonathan Toewsand Andrews Ladd answered the call; promptly scoring to tie up the game. Craig Adams and Kane again scored to make the score 5-3. When Ladd scored again, the announcer went behind the bench to get an exclusive interview about his goals. He asked Ladd who would get the first hat trick, him or Kane? Ladd graciously said Kane. After Patrick Sharp scored twice and Adam Burish scored, Kane did indeed get the first hat trick. This put the scoreboard into the double digits making it 10-11, World Team. The charity game was played with very few rules; however every penalty made would result in a penalty shot. Unfortunately, a penalty was called on the Stars and resulted in the World Team’s goalie, Niklas Backstrom, goalie for the Minnesota Wild, taking a shot. Using his larger goalie stick, he put the puck past Anderson, giving the World Team the lead. Ladd was able to score against Backstrom to give the Stars another hat trick for the night.Jake Dowel also pushed the puck past Backstrom for his first goal of the game. With the score of 15-14, the Stars were down by one with only 1:22 left on the clock. Almost out of time, Toews passed to Kane for the equalizer. With only seconds left in the game, all the fans were on the edge of their seats. The last minute was an eternity for the teams and the fans. Every puck shot was blocked or saved, leaving the score tied at the end of regulation. Instead of overtime, they went straight to a shoot out. The rules were the same as regulation shoot outs: best of five wins. Toews first show went far left, and Backstrom made the save. Bobby Ryan of the World Team snuck the puck past Anderson to score; 0-1 World Team. Patrick Sharp scored for the Stars, and Jordan Staal couldn’t get the puck past Anderson, leaving the game tied at 1-1. Kane scored next, but Ville Leino wasn’t so lucky.  Andrew Ladd and Jake Dowell were both unable to score. Kimmo Timonen scored for the World Team after the fourth round, tying the shoot out 2-2. As Daniel Carcillo took the ice for the World Team’s last chance, it boiled down to his shot. Anderson couldn’t make the save and the World Team won the game 16-15. Although the Chicago Stars were disappointed with the loss, the arena remained enthusiastic about the amount of money they had raised. The president of the Ronald McDonald House Chicago was in attendance to collect the giant check the Chicago Blackhawks had made out to them. The cheering was deafening, and the children’s smiles spread from ear to ear. The essence of the cause put the whole night in perspective; this event was for the children....

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