The Independent

People You Should Know – Dr. Bullard, Environmental Activist

April 17, 2012

Filed under Campus Spotlight

By Dr. Bullard's biography provided by: www.drrobertbullard.com/biography/biography.html Robert D. Bullard is the Dean of the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas. He is often described as the father of environmental justice. Professor Bullard received his Ph.D. degree from Iowa State University. He is the author of seventeen books that address sustainable development, environmental racism, urban land use, industrial facility siting, community reinvestment, housing, transportation, climate justice, emergency response, smart growth, and regional equity. Professor Bullard was featured in the July 2007 CNN People You Should Know, Bullard: Green Issue is Black and White. In 2008, Newsweek named him one of 13 Environmental Leaders of the Century. And that same year, Co-op America honored him with its Building Economic Alternatives Award (BEA). In 2010, The Grio named him one of the “100 Black History Makers in the Making” and Planet Harmony named him one of Ten African American Green Heroes. His book, Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class and Environmental Quality (Westview Press, 2000), is a standard text in the environmental justice field. His most recent books include Just Sustainabilities: Development in an Unequal World (MIT Press, 2003), Highway Robbery: Transportation Racism and New Routes to Equity (South End Press, 2004), The Quest for Environmental Justice: Human Rights and the Politics of Pollution (Sierra Club Books, 2005), Growing Smarter: Achieving Livable Communities, Environmental Justice, and Regional Equity (MIT Press, 2007), and The Black Metropolis in the Twenty-First Century: Race, Power, and the Politics of Place (Rowman & Littlefield, 2007). Dr. Bullard is co-author of In the Wake of the Storm: Environment, Disaster and Race After Katrina (Russell Sage Foundation, 2006) and Toxic Wastes and Race at Twenty: 1987-2007 (United Church of Christ Witness & Justice Ministries, 2007). His latest books includes Race, Place and Environmental Justice After Hurricane Katrina: Struggles to Reclaim, Rebuild, and Revitalize New Orleans and the Gulf Coast (Westview Press, 2009) and Environmental Health and Racial Equality in the United States: Strategies for Building Just, Sustainable and Livable Communities (American Public Health Association Press, April, 2011). He is completing a new book project, The Wrong Complexion for Protection: How the Government Response to Disaster Endangers African American Communities (forthcoming 2012, New York University Press). Dr. Bullard's biography provided by: www.drrobertbullard.com/biography/biography.html...

Eagle Eye Advice

Lakeesha J. Harris, Senior Staff Writer

April 17, 2012

Filed under Golden Perspectives

It’s so good to be back after a brief hiatus of the Eagle Eye Advice column. I was looking forward to going through all of the incoming emails to our NEIU advice column. As I was preparing for this week’s column, one question caught my eye, mostly because of the level of construction work that I participated in during my...

NEIU Celebrates its Phenomenal Women Leaders

Janean L. Watkins, Editor in Chief

March 5, 2012

Filed under Campus Spotlight

                                                                                          As the Editor in Chief of the paper, and founder of Seeds Literary Journal of NEIU, I understand what it takes to perform in leadership roles here at NEIU. That's why, for women's history month we decided that the best way to pay homage to the women leaders here at the university, was to create a spread that showcase the phenomenal, female student leaders of the NEIU community. When searching for women to honor, we ran across 18 women that are Presidents of the respective organizations. Through pregnancies, poverty, and various forms of adversity – these women has persevered. Not only are they mothers, wives, workers and scholars – these women are in positions of power. They are using what they've got, to make NEIU a better place for each and every student – one organization at a time. Follow them, as they tell you a bit about themselves, and what they do in their everyday lives. ~*~*~*~ Stephanie Gomez is a young Latina feminist raised in Chicago. She founded Latinas in Power (L.I.P.), a sisterhood that promotes academic success and a firm cultural identity for Latinas in college. Currently studying Sociology, she plans on graduating May 2012 and beginning a Master's Program in Latino and Latin American Studies in the fall. She is a Robert E. McNair Scholar and a nominee in "Who's Who Among Colleges and Universities". In addition to researching and organizing, she finds peace in writing and sharing her poetry. She is a true believer that there is power in our narratives and that healing takes place when we share our deepest fears with our comadres. VIVA LA MUJER! "Surround yourself with good people, people who appreciate your light. Don't let anyone dim your light!" – Stephanie Gomez **** *********************************** Hello, my name is Danait Araia and I am President of the Student Government Association. I am a senior here at NEIU and expect to graduate this Spring with a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science. My interest in government stems from my family's participation in Eritrea. My immediate family and I came to America as political refugees and although we are displaced we continue to fight against oppression in Eritrea. I have been heavily involved in many international and African non-profit organizations with this mission in mind for most of my life. Since joining the NEIU community I have participated in Model Illinois Government twice and SGA for two years. I started in SGA as a Representative in the Council of Clubs in fall 2010. Last year I decided to run for SGA leadership and campaigned for the Vice President position. This semester I was promoted to President and it has really been a great opportunity to refine my leadership skills and experiences before I graduate. I believe my participation in SGA will prepare me for the future and I strongly suggest students look into joining or participating before they leave NEIU.   *************************************** I'm Courtney Jennings-Hope, a 23 year old student who hails from Gurnee IL. I am a Junior, and a Political Science major with a minor in Philosophy. I am active in several clubs, which include my Presidency in the Politics club, membership in Model United Nations and Model Illinois Government; I'm also in the SGA as the IBHE-SAC Rep and was recently voted Secretary of the IBHE-SAC. Off campus I work at a local library and I am a tutor for adults working to read and write at an adult level, as well as, with at-risk teens who have ambitions to attend college. "No one can make you feel inferior without your permission. Don't be afraid to take initiative. Go for it!" – Courtney Jennings-Hope *************************************** I am Andrea M. Yetzer, Co-Chair of the NEIU Sociology Club. I am a Senior, and a double major in Psychology and Sociology. As a graduating senior, I spend most of my time on campus in the library, running the Sociology Club, and engaging in Psychological research, while simultaneously attempting to socialize with some of the amazing people I have met at NEIU along the way. Off campus I work full-time as a Behavior Detection Officer at O'Hare. I keep busy organizing group gatherings with friends and coworkers, along with training for and participating in obstacle racing. "Always challenge yourself, never assume you can't do something. Always go for it!" – Andrea Yetzer *************************************** Justice Studies major and President of the Amnesty International club at NEIU, Sharon J. Rehana is a first-generation Chicagoan who brings with her an Assyrian cultural upbringing, strong family roots and a passion for discovering more about the world she lives in. She is currently working on her second B.A., and looks forward to integrating her background as a journalist and teacher with overseas experience, towards promoting peace and compassion throughout the world. Sharon hopes that by drawing awareness through Amnesty International on campus, humanity can reach its highest peak.   "Stand up to what you believe in, use criticisms that come your way as a source of strength." - Sharon Rehana *************************************** "Hey everybody! I'm Nergal, the current acting President of the Feminist Collective. Much of my time on campus is divided between the club, classes, and my job as an FYE Peer Mentor. Occasionally, I can be found dragging my feet in an futile attempt to delay going to class. In my free time, I'm glued to my PS3, League of Legends, and general Pro-Choice ranting set to the tunes of my mother's favorite Assyrian artists. "Don't take any $#!+ ever! No one is going to speak for you. Don't be afraid to get emotional." – Nergal Malham *************************************** Marlene Julye is an OIF/OEF veteran, the president of NEIU's Student Veterans Club and a Senior in the NEIU Social Work bachelor's program. From 2004-2009 she served in the United States Navy as a MH-60s helicopter mechanic before returning to school. Along with being a full time student she regularly volunteers with Girl Scouts of America and interns with Albany Park Community Center in their veterans outreach program. This year, she was appointed to the National Leadership Committee for Student Veterans of America to serve as an advisor to student veterans as well as their organizations. After graduating in May 2012 Marlene will be pursuing her masters in Social Work and plans to work with veterans and their families. "If you think you're at the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on! Just keep going!" – Marlene Julye *************************************** Lakeesha J. Harris is a graduate student of Political Science at NEIU seeking her Master's degree in comparative politics and international relations. In 2011 she graduated cum laude from NEIU with her B.A. in Women's Studies. She is also the 2011 Student Laureate of NEIU and a McNair Scholar. Currently, Lakeesha is the Editor In Chief of.:Seeds:. Literary Arts Journal of NEIU and the newly elected Student Trustee. As a Senior Staff Writer for the NEIU Independent she is dedicated to providing timely advice the NEIU community. Lakeesha is also a fierce advocate for education reform and women's and LGBTQ rights. She has been featured on WBEZ's Chicago Matters series, Chicago Tribune, and her essays and poems have appeared in several magazines and anthologies including Ebony (2010) and the upcoming anthology "Sex Crimes Against Black Girls." "See every opportunity as a learning experience; even the small ones, use your instincts and let them be your guide." – Lakeesha Harris *************************************** I am Nicole Maldonado. As a senior majoring in sociology, I have carved out a niche for myself in my three semesters at NEIU. I am Co-Chair of Sociology Club; where we promote critical thinking through academic discourse. I also tutor students in Sociology in the Learning Support Center. Off campus I volunteer for the Sex Workers Outreach Project and the All-Stars Network. I am anti-capitalist, vegan, feminist and dedicated to fighting inequality in all forms.   *************************************** Cathleen Schandelmeier-Bartels graduated from Northeastern Illinois University with her Bachelor's Degree in 1989. She is now a graduate student in the College of Education where she is working on her Master of Arts in Teaching degree with an expected graduation date of May 2012. As a leader, Cathleen has served as President for the NEIU Illinois Education Association (2009-2010), worked as a Senior Staff Writer for the NEIU Independent (2008-2011), and as Station Manager for WZRD Chicago, 88.3 FM - NEIU's freeform radio station where she is now a "wizard" (disc jockey).   *************************************** My name is LaMaria C. Howard; I am President of the Black Heritage Gospel Choir. My major is Interdisciplinary Studies, and I am a Senior with an expected graduation date of May 5th 2012. On campus, I am active with the choir and show support to various organizations. On & off campus, I am a mother of an energetic 2 year old daughter, Ariel. I work part time as an HR Recruiter and I volunteer at youth based non-profit organization. I believe that education is key! "Find a focus and make it your main goal!" – LaMaria Howard *************************************** Starr De Los Santos is a Puerto Rican and Dominican lesbian who grew up in Washington Heights, New York. She is currently a Senior at Northeastern Illinois University. She is majoring in Justice Studies with a double minor in Sociology and Philosophy and plans on graduating this upcoming May. She has previously worked as a peer mentor for the Dean of Students Office and since then has been very involved on campus. She has participated in many different clubs and organizations and has served on numerous committees on and off campus. She has worked in many different leadership positions and has also trained other individuals on leadership development. She is now the President of Northeastern Programming Board and has done an amazing job along with her colleagues in making NPB more visible on campus. NPB is in charge of planning different fun and educational events throughout the school year for NEIU students and the community to participate in. Starr plans to stay at Northeastern and obtain her Masters in Political Science; afterwards she would like to attend law school. She is striving to enter the political world in hopes to promote equality and justice throughout the nation.  ...

Katrina Bell-Jordan – Inspiring Success

Jacklyn Nowotnik, Arts & Life Editor

March 5, 2012

Filed under Campus Spotlight

  Katrina Bell-Jordan is currently the Department Chair for the CMT department at NEIU. She has been at NEIU for almost 15 years and has taught numerous courses in the CMT department ranging from the 100 to 400 level. However, when asked about her career, Bell-Jordan will smile warmly and tell you that she didn't initially set out to become a teacher. Coming from a family of teachers, Bell-Jordan decided that she wanted to be different and received her B.S. in Journalism from the E.W. Scipps School of Journalism at Ohio University. She began writing for the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the New York Daily News. In the midst of the headlines and deadlines, both her family and trusted colleagues advised her to continue her education while she could without losing her edge in the world of print. Bell-Jordan said that while she didn't expect a chance to complete her M.A. in Interpersonal Communication during her journalism career, it was "an opportunity too good to pass up." After completing her M.A. at Ohio University, Bell-Jordan went into a PhD program and worked as a graduate teaching associate. This academic experience exposed Bell-Jordan to the impact a teacher can make on the lives of students and instilled in her a desire to teach media and communications. In 1997, Bell-Jordan began teaching as an assistant professor of Communications at NEIU and became one of the strongest assets NEIU has to offer. As a teacher, the sincerity Bell-Jordan displays when teaching and her ability to connect and relate to students of all ages even after moving into a more administrative position has kept her classes in high demand and her department positively motivated to both serve and support students. Her academic peers hold her in equally high esteem. Dr. Adams, a CMT professor at NEIU, described Bell-Jordan as "unique, equitable, a hard worker, a visionary, and a compassionate leader." Dr. Mun, another CMT professor at NEIU said "She is a really professional person. As a human being." Dr. Mun went on to say "She's really friendly and when people ask for help she's really supportive and tries to understand their situation in their shoes. So I really like that." Dr. Mun's statement of Bell-Jordan definitely rings true in her classes as she brings to the class her experience, expertise and questions dealing with media. Her classes involve a very conversational style in which she brings up questions related to the class material, which allows her students to openly and critically think about the subject matter. In her classes, Bell-Jordan encourages students to think a little further into the matter and really connect what they learn to their daily lives. Aside from academics and publishing, Bell-Jordan also conducted research in the areas of race and representation in the media, Black popular culture, identity politics and comedic performance. When asked why she was interested in researching those topics she said that it was a "natural extension of who I am, and the kind of questions I asked about the media." She also added that "I am a consumer, I like pop culture like everybody else, and I think popular culture is such a reflection of who we are in terms of a nation, in terms of the west, and it was a way for me to express my social interests that were fun and interesting to me." When asked what she would like her students to take away from her classes, Bell-Jordan said the she wanted them to have the ability and tools to question and read everything in the spirit of learning. She would like her students to apply those tools to their lives and become more critical consumers. Bell-Jordan also expressed that the CMT department just went through a year-long program review, which assess how well the department is doing. She hopes the CMT department will "maintain the level of engagement that our students have in what they're doing in our classrooms, continue to see our curriculum grow, continue to attract really talented faculty, support the good work that is being done and to look for ways to serve our students even better."...

Eagle Eye Advice

Lakeesha J. Harris, Senior Staff Writer

February 26, 2012

Filed under Golden Perspectives

Published: Saturday, February 25, 2012 Updated: Saturday, March 3, 2012 01:03 Keesha, Since the Adult and Women's office is no more, where can adults NEIU students get info on important resources they need to help them succeed, such as low cost childcare? I ask because the Head Start program in Uptown I am working for is opening a new room this Monday. The teacher is bilingual, speaking Spanish and English. We can accept kids between the ages of 3-5. We also have space in our 2-year-old room. Who can I give this info to at NEIU? Who could relay this to low income students who are in need of this service? Thanks for your help. Wynne Turkington – NEIU Alumna Hello Wynne, This is a very good question. As I walk across campus, I've noticed an increase in the amount of students with children in tow, going off to classes.  Some have confided in me that they lost their low cost childcare due to lack of state funding. One friend of mine in particular said that she was denied child care because she was a graduate student and the state thought that she should be able to afford childcare on her own as a graduate student. What this tells me is that our university, especially since the average student age is 27 years old, should be looking into more efficient ways to serve our student population – especially in regards to resources that will assist students to stay in school. I am glad that your organization is offering childcare services to the students of NEIU and I am happy to print it here. Students who are looking for low cost child-care services, please contact the Winthrop Children's Center. It's a full day head start program. Wynne Turkington is the family service worker and can be reached by calling (773) 878-4210. Dear Lakeesha, I've been having problems with a professor in my program. We got off to a bad start last semester due to disagreements over his teaching style and I have him again for a class this semester too. I feel like he's ignoring me during class discussions and is grading me more harshly than everyone else. I am probably going to have him again at some point during my time here and I just want to resolve our differences. What's the best way to approach him? Anonymous, Sophmore Dear Anon Sophmore, I think that most students come across the "Payback" professor. This is the professor who wields his/her power of the grade to subdue the "out of control" student. Towing the line of professor-student relationships can be a tricky balancing act, and students often feel powerless to do anything if they feel wronged. This is nothing new in the world of academia. Here's the good news. As a student, you have the power of petition.  You should start by having a conversation with your professor. Let him/her know your feelings and see if there is a solution that will work for both of you. As students we often forget that professors were also once students, and may have felt slighted along their path toward higher education. Most conflicts with professors can be resolved through this simple step. If, after this conversation, you feel that amicable results were not gained from this interaction, you may need to work the chain of protocol. This will lead you to the department head next. Whatever program or department you are in has either a program coordinator or department chair. Find out who that person is and schedule a meeting with them. More often than not they can act as a mediator between you and professor "Payback". If no resolution can be reached by this method you have two other options. You can go to the Dean of your college or you can do a grade appeal once the grades are turned in for the semester. The grade appeal process can be found in the student handbook and accessed online at http://www.neiu.edu/~deanstu/handbookDirectory.html. I hope all of this helps you to feel empowered. By the way, document everything. You will need it to back up your claim of misconduct....

Eagle Eye Advice: Timely Advice for Real Problems

Lakeesha J. Harris, Senior Staff Writter

February 7, 2012

Filed under Golden Perspectives

  Published: Monday, February 6, 2012 Updated: Tuesday, February 7, 2012 03:02 Eagle Eye advice is committed to providing real answers to everyday problems. As it is Black History month I wanted to dedicate this space to the integral issue of mental health and suicides among African Americans. One question came across my desk right after the passing of Don Cornelius, long time host of Soul Train, due to an apparent suicide. Q. Dear Lakeesha, For years mental health has been taboo topic in my family. I am African American and we just don't talk about stuff like that. I am finding that many of my family members are dealing with it through drug use or not at all. I am concerned that this is a generational thing, as I find myself depressed and can't explain way. As an African American, how can we start the conversation about mental health issues in our community? No one wants to talk about it. What can students like me do to get mental health services on our campus? - Anonymous Junior A. Dear Anon – Junior, I am so glad that you are reaching out. Tackling mental health issues can be a great undertaking as many mental health resources are drying up due to the economy, and quite frankly, mental health is treated like a dangerous topic within our community. Quite often we underestimate the limits of what we can take on men- tally on a day-to-day basis, because we've been socially trained to suck it up and shut up. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), while depression is most likely caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors, it can happen to anyone. Another study done by NIMH showed that less than half of African Americans with a Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are likely to seek treatment, and African Americans are likely to experience MDD chronically and more severely than their age counterparts of other ethnicities. In short, you are not alone, and it's great to recognize that you need help tackling this issue. Reaching out is the first step toward a mentally healthier you and contacting a mental health professional could be the best thing that you do for the rest of your life. Your story struck a personal cord with me as mental health issues run in my family too, and I felt as you did, unable to talk about them be- cause they were taboo. Everything seemed to go wrong in my younger years, I was very depressed and a danger to myself. I was lucky that someone found me before I took my life. Every day I realize how my absence from this world would have affected those I love and who love me. Others aren't so lucky and feel they have to navigate this very tough terrain alone. So please remember that you aren't alone and there are resources available to you right here at NEIU. Northeastern Illinois University has free counseling services on our campus that can be reached by calling (773) 446-4650. You can visit their offices in room D-024, right below the Enrollment Services Office. Would you like to submit a question? Email us at: [email protected]

Anime Club Game Night

Syed Ahad Hussain, Senior Staff Writer

February 7, 2011

Filed under Campus Spotlight

The Anime Club's bi-monthly Game Night was held in SU- 003 on the evening of Jan. 21; the selection of games included BlazBlue: Continuum Shift, Halo Reach, as well as card games like Dragon Shield, Magic, and UNO. "Game night is one of the events [that's] free for NEIU students—everybody is welcome and students can bring...

Man On The Street

January 25, 2011

Filed under Golden Perspectives

  NEIU Independent Taiwan NEIU Independent Tiffany NEIU Independent Amber "I couldn't get into certain classes…they should have handled that more quickly being that they are a university not a junior college. It was real time-consuming." -Taiwan, Junior   "It dropped me from classes I was registered for…when the system came back up, I lost those classes. I'm actually still having problems with that. Now there's the departmental approval, so now I have to go through more obstacles." -Tiffany, Freshman   "It was really a big pain, because you couldn't trade your classes. They shut down one of our classes and we couldn't sign up for the next one." -Amber, Senior...

Have a sweet day

Katie Pastorelli, Staff writer

October 10, 2006

Filed under Arts & Life, Holiday

Sweetest Day is very much like Valentine's Day, only later. The third Saturday of the month of October is the day to spend with your special sweetie. Sweetest Day began in Cleveland in 1922 by a man named Herbert Birch Kingston, a philanthropist and an employer in a candy store. His goal one day was to bring happiness to...

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